What Can I Do To Increase My Home’s Value

Some the features that increase property values are obvious-like a remodeled bathroom, a modern kitchen, or a sought-after neighborhood. But here are a few features and circumstances you have not have realized can affect property values.

  1. The neighbors: Not every neighborhood or community has an HOA that can keep the neighbors from going overboard with decorations or neglecting to care for their home. Homes adjacent to crazy neighbors can potentially be undervalued.
  2. Trendy groceries and coffee: Recent statistics suggest that if your home is a short walk from popular grocery stores like Whole Foods or coffee chains like Starbucks, it can actually appreciate faster than the national average.
  3. Mature trees: A big beautiful tree in the front yard is enviable, and it’s not something that can be easily added to any home. Homes with mature trees tend to get a little boost in value.
  4. Parking: This isn’t too much of an issue if you live in the suburbs or in a rural area, but residents in dense cities can have real problems with parking, and homeowners might need to rent a spot just to guarantee a place to park each night. That’s why having guaranteed parking in urban areas will raise property values.
  5. The front entrance: First impressions matter to buyers-many will cross a home off their list within 10 seconds of stepping through the front door. An appealing front door, a friendly entryway, and a functioning doorbell are all necessities for getting top dollar.

San Ramon Home Sales 2nd Qtr 2017

San Ramon home sales for the second quarter of 2017. These numbers are for single family detached homes:

  • 261 Units Sold
  • Average Sales Price $1,169,633
  • Median Sales Price $1,120,000
  • Highest Price $2,375,000
  • Lowest Price $619,000
  • Average Days on Market 18

Average sales price is down 1% over first quarter of 2017, yet more than double the units, 261 vs 121

Loving Home Ownership

Innovative Idea for a Swimming Pool

Want a pool yet either don’t have the money or your yard is too small. What about a using a shipping container to create your backyard fun. Sound silly, a couple came up with the idea called Modpools. Oh and if you move you can take the pool with you. Here is an excerpt from an article in RSI Media Housecalls.

“Paul and Denise Rathnam launched Modpools earlier this year and the idea has taken off, with orders mostly coming from the hottest locales in North America, particularly California, Nevada, Texas and Florida. It’s an interesting concept, for sure, and the design, once installed, looks pretty slick. It’s as if your backyard was always destined to house a shipping container.”

The standard size Modpool is eight feet wide by 20 feet long, and just over five feet deep. It also comes with a clear, acrylic window on one side, which is actually a pretty spiffy design element. Customers can opt to add another acrylic window on the other side for a see-through look if they want one.

Source:RSI Medias Housecalls; rsimedia.com

Don’t Let Your Biggest Asset End Up In Probate

A will is the most common way to transfer real property upon a person’s death, but this does not avoid probate. Probate can be expensive with attorney fees and court costs and can take up to a year to complete.  The way to keep all of your assets out of probate is to set up a trust. Yet for many whose estate consists primarily of the home, the money to establish a trust may be unaffordable.

Californians have an easy remedy to keep their home out of probate with the passage of Assembly Bill 139 which became effective in 2016, creates the Revocable Transfer on Death (TOD) Deed which would transfer to a named beneficiary 1 to 4 unit residential real properties on the death of its owner without a probate proceeding or a living trust.

The Revocable Transfer on Death deed is the most simple and inexpensive transfer mechanism on the market today. Furthermore, it may be the only tool available to unmarried homeowners who wish to leave their property to a lifelong partner, family member, friend, or loved one upon death. .

The deed has no effect until a person dies, and can be revoked at any time. The revocable TOD deed must be signed, dated and acknowledged before a notary public, and must be recorded at the County within 60 days after execution.

 

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